Molecular structure and the properties of liquid crystals.

  • 314 Pages
  • 2.27 MB
  • 9496 Downloads
  • English
by
Academic Press , London, New York
Liquid crystals., Molecular struc
Classifications
LC ClassificationsQD921 .G72
The Physical Object
Pagination314 p.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL5829864M
LC Control Number61018803

Molecular Structure and Properties of Liquid Crystals Hardcover – December 1, by G.W. Gray (Author) See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editionsAuthor: G.W. Gray. Molecular Structure and the Properties of Liquid Crystals, von G. Gray. Academic Press, Inc., London‐New York 1.

Aufl., VI, S., zahlr. Abb. und Tab., geb. £ –. Wilhelm Mayer. Search for more papers by this author. Wilhelm Mayer. Search for more papers by this author. First published: by: 1. “Structure and Properties of Liquid Crystals discusses the theoretical concepts necessary to understand the liquid-crystal phase from the perspective of an experimentalist.

All the necessary theory is there for a wide range of topics in the physics of liquid crystals. Cited by:   Molecular Structure and Properties of Liquid Crystals. Gray. Academic Press, New York, vii + pp. Illus. 63s. By M. by: 1. Try the new Google Books. Check out the new look and enjoy easier access to your favorite features.

Try it now. Molecular Structure and the Properties of Liquid Crystals. Gray. Academic Press, - Liquid crystals - pages. 0 Reviews. Molecular Structure and the Properties of Liquid Crystals: Author: G.

Description Molecular structure and the properties of liquid crystals. EPUB

Gray: Publisher. Get this from a library. Molecular structure and the properties of liquid crystals. [G W Gray]. Liquid-crystalline phases are now known to be formed by an ever growing range of quite diverse materials, these include those of low molecular weight as well as the novel liquid-crystalline polymers, such phases can also be induced by the addition of a solvent to amphiphilic systems leading to lyotropic liquid crystals.

This handbook is a unique compendium of knowledge on all aspects of the physics of liquid crystals. In over pages it provides detailed information on the physical properties of liquid crystals as well as the recent theories and results on phase transitions, defects and textures of different types of liquid crystals.

Summary Liquid crystals tend to consist of rigid molecules with polar groups, and their anisotropic structures exhibit unusual optical and electrical properties.

Many substances exhibit phases that have properties intermediate between those of a crystalline solid and a normal liquid. Antioxidant Phenolic Constituents in Roots of Rheum officinale and Rubia cordifolia: Structure−Radical Scavenging Activity Relationships.

Langmuir. Responsive Micellar Films of Amphiphilic Block Copolymer Micelles: Control on Micelle Opening and Closing. Macromolecules. A Study of the Degree of Fluorination in Regioregular Poly(3-hexylthiophene). Molecular structure and the properties of liquid crystals.

London, New York, Academic Press, (OCoLC) Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: G W Gray. The book consists of three parts: the first part, on structure, starts from the fundamental principles underlying the structure of liquid crystals, their rich phase behaviour and the methods used to study them; the second part, on physical properties, emphasizes the influence of anisotropy on all aspects of liquid crystals behaviour; the third.

The first chapters discuss the physical, chemical, structural, and optical properties of liquid crystals, as well as the structure of the principal molecules associated with life systems.

The core chapters cover selected cellular structures exhibiting liquid crystalline behavior to emphasize the nature of various cellular membranes, from the. It emphasizes that the physical state of the matter involved in life processes is to a great extent liquid crystalline.

The first chapters discuss the physical, chemical, structural, and optical properties of liquid crystals, as well as the structure of the principal molecules associated with life systems.

All journal articles featured in Molecular Crystals and Liquid Crystals vol issue 1. Molecular Crystals and Liquid Crystals. Impact Factor. Search in: Advanced search.

Submit an article. New Experimental and computational studies on the structure and properties of a novel low-spin iron(III) macrocyclic complex. A liquid crystal phase has many of the physical attributes of a liquid, but its molecular units are sufficiently ordered to give rise to some anisotropy, most notably in their optical properties.

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As with so many scientific discoveries, it all started with an unexpected observation. Liquid crystals are organic materials. Several benzene rings are connected linearly giving the molecule an elongated form. This part of a molecule is called the molecular core. Alkyl chains are attached to both sides of the molecule.

Liquid crystal materials generally have several common characteristics. Among these are a rod- like molecular structure, rigidness of the long axis, and strong dipole and/or easily polarizable substituents. A dipole is present when we have t wo equal electric or magnetic charges of opposite sign, separated by a small distance.

Masaru Emoto (江本 勝, Emoto Masaru, J – Octo ) was a Japanese author and pseudo-scientist who claimed that human consciousness can effect the molecular structure of 's book The Hidden Messages in Water published in was a New York Times best seller.

Emoto's conjecture evolved over the years, and his early work revolved around pseudo. The text begins with an historical account of the discovery of liquid crystals and continues with a description of how different phases are generated and how different molecular architectures affect liquid crystalline properties.

The rest of the book is concerned with understanding and explaining the properties of the various types of liquid /5(2). of Liquid Crystals. Cholesteric (Chiral nematic) phases as optical materials.

The Exocuticles of Beetles. contain Layers of Chitin, a naturally occurring. polysaccaride that. possesses a cholesteric. liquid crystal Structure. The scarab beetle plusiotis woodi viewed under both a left and right circular polarizer.

A supra-molecular helical.

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Liquid-crystalline stationary phases are used for the separation of positional and geometric isomers of rigid molecules. Liquid crystals exhibit the mechanical properties of a liquid while retaining some of the anisotropic properties of the solid state.

This preservation of order permits shape selectivity, while the liquid properties result in acceptable chromatographic efficiency. Molecular Crystals and Liquid Crystals Science and Technology. Section A. Molecular Crystals and Liquid Crystals ( - ) Molecular Crystals and Liquid Crystals ( - ) Molecular Crystals and Liquid Crystals Incorporating Nonlinear Optics ( - ) Molecular Crystals and Liquid Crystals ( - ) Molecular Crystals ( - ).

The text begins with an historical account of the discovery of liquid crystals and continues with a description of how different phases are generated and how different molecular architectures affect liquid crystalline properties. The rest of the book is concerned with understanding and explaining the properties of the various types of liquid Reviews: 2.

The only way many of the properties of water can be explained is by understanding that water has a unique molecular structure. Certain circumstances, discussed in detail in the book, Dancing with Water, encourage water to form a repeating, geometric, molecular pattern where water becomes a liquid crystal.

2 shows the molecular structure of a typical rod-like liquid crystal molecule. It consists of two or more ring systems connected by a central linkage group. The liquid crystal molecules prefer to align parallel to each other because of the strong inter-molecular attraction (- interactions).

The characteristic feature of LCs is the presence. Crystals (ISSN ; CODEN: CRYSBC) is an open access journal, published monthly online by MDPI, that covers all aspects of crystalline material research, including liquid crystals and biomolecular crystals.

Open Access —free for readers, with article processing charges (APC) paid by authors or their institutions.; High Visibility: Indexed by the Science Citation Index Expanded (SCIE.

Physical properties are governed by the intermolecular forces - forces attracting one molecule to its neighbours - van der Waals attractions or hydrogen bonds.

Melting and boiling points. Molecular substances tend to be gases, liquids or low melting point solids, because the intermolecular forces of attraction are comparatively weak. Dr Masaru Emoto, the Japanese scientist and water researcher, revealed the true nature of water and how thoughts and vibrations affect the molecular structure of his years of water research, through high speed photography of thousands of water crystals, Dr Emoto has shown the most beautiful crystals are those formed after the water is exposed to the words ‘love and gratitude.’.

Analysis of optical and thermal properties of double hydrogen bonded liquid crystal binary mixtures. Molecular Crystals and Liquid Crystals(1), DOI: /. Molecular Crystals and Molecules deals with some of the problems of molecular crystallography and certain aspects of molecular structure.

This book is composed of eight chapters that specifically cover the significant progress of conformational research.of liquid crystals, a summary of present knowledge of the physical and chemical properties of liquid crystals, and a section on present and possible future appli-cations.

Theories of the structure of liquid crystals, thermodynamics, the effect.Liquid crystals may be classified in two major categories, namely, thermotropic and lyotropic. Thermotropic liquid crystals are commonly prepared by heating organic compounds, whereas lyotropic liquid crystals are made by mixing two or more components.

Thermotropic liquid crystals are mainly of interest in this paper. They have been classified as nematic (threadlike) and smectic (soapy).